Menu
Beta-version
RU

WHAT IS EVALUATED AND HOW

The goal of the Urban environment Quality Index is not only to rate the city, but to determine what exactly is in poor condition and why. The evaluation system has 120 indicators, each of which relates to a specific type of urban space and reflects the quality of the environment according to one of the criteria.

Depending on the availability of data and the emergence of new methods of analyzing urban space, the set of 30 indicators is selected annually.

Such an index is similar to express medical diagnostics, conducted in order to identify the main problems related to city development. Once a problem is discovered, it is possible to move to studying it and recommending a specific treatment program.

Indicators:

  • Housing and adjacent areas
    Collapse
    SAFETY
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of condemned housing (%).
    • 2. Share of housing with a deterioration percentage exceeding 65% (%).
    • 3. Number of road traffic accidents close to housing areas involving pedestrians (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 4. Number of fires in residential buildings during the last year (no. / km2).
    COMFORT
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of courtyards equipped with a children’s playground, sports facilities or other similar area (%).
    • 2. Share of houses with social infrastructure (schools, hospitals, kindergartens) within walking distance of appropriate quantity (%).
    • 3. Share of households living in accommodation where more than three people inhabit each room (%).
    • 4. Share of housing with water supply, heat supply and sewerage (%).
    ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLINESS
    • 1.
      2017
      Volume of collected solid waste per capita (thousand m3 / person).
    • 2. Share of heat losses in municipal heat supply systems (%).
    • 3. Share of green areas in adjacent areas (%).
    • 4. Share of courtyards in residential buildings where energy-saving lighting is used (%).
    IDENTITY AND DIVERSITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Diversity of residential buildings (%).
    • 2. Share of panel apartment buildings in total housing stock (%).
    • 3. Share of housing built based on individual design projects (%).
    • 4. Ratio of average market price per housing unit in the city’s most expensive and cheapest areas (in terms of purchase) (%).
    ENVIRONMENT MODERNITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Diversity of functions in the residential zone (%).
    • 2. Share of multi-apartment buildings with organized parking spaces (%).
    • 3. Number of registered rental agreements (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 4. Average time a citizen spends commuting to work in one direction (min).
  • Green and water areas
    Collapse
    SAFETY
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of green public spaces (parks, gardens, etc.) in total green areas (%).
    • 2. Share of forest areas swept by fire in total forest areas (%).
    • 3. Number of accidents on water (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 4. Share of illuminated embankments within the city in the total length of the water front (%).
    COMFORT
    • 1.
      2017
      Density of pedestrian infrastructure in green areas (km / km2)
    • 2. Length of green lawn surfaces along streets located below the level of the sidewalk and separated from it by curb stones (%).
    • 3. Share of recreational areas equipped with street furniture and utility objects (%).
    • 4. Percentage of parks equipped with free stationary city toilets (%).
    ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLINESS
    • 1.
      2017
      Condition of planted vegetation (%).
    • 2. Share of residential areas with a park or public garden within walking distance (%).
    • 3. Quality of surface water in urban water bodies (score).
    • 4. Share of urban area where reagents are used to remove snow in winter (%).
    IDENTITY AND DIVERSITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Number of photographs on social networks taken by citizens in green areas (no. / km2).
    • 2. Ratio of number of photographs on social networks taken in city parks in winter and summer (%).
    • 3. Share of parks with their own developed brand (%).
    • 4. Percentage of parks where free regular events (sports or education) are held (%).
    ENVIRONMENT MODERNITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Number of diverse services provided to citizens in green zones (no. / km2).
    • 2. Ratio of well-maintained banks of water bodies within the city to the total length of the water front (%).
    • 3. Percentage of roads with green areas along them (%).
    • 4. Forest area expropriated for construction (ha).
  • Street infrastructure
    Collapse
    SAFETY
    • 1.
      2017
      Number of traffic fatalities (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 2. Injury rate in winter (cases / 1,000 people).
    • 3. Share of roads not meeting regulatory requirements in the total length of roads (%).
    • 4. Ratio of underground and over ground pedestrian crossings (%).
    COMFORT
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of roads with an improved road surface (%).
    • 2. Average time spent by a citizen in traffic jams per year (h).
    • 3. Percentage of streets equipped with sidewalks at least 3 meters wide (%).
    • 4. Percentage of public transport stops equipped with rain and wind shelters, litter bins and places to rest (%).
    ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLINESS
    • 1.
      2017
      Traffic congestion (points).
    • 2. Share of trips made by citizens using public transport in total number of trips (%).
    • 3. Share of streets, driveways, embankments equipped with underground gutters (%).
    • 4. Percentage of buildings located in areas with increased noise pollution (%).
    IDENTITY AND DIVERSITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Number of streets with developed street retail (no.).
    • 2. Percentage of city space occupied by streets in total urban area (%).
    • 3. Length of streets where overhead communication lines are removed underground (%).
    • 4. Percentage of street stalls and newsagents decorated in a single established style (%).
    ENVIRONMENT MODERNITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Pedestrian accessibility index (%).
    • 2. Average transit time from residential areas to the city center, taking into account all modes of transportation (min / km2).
    • 3. Length of public transport lanes in the total length of bus routes (%).
    • 4. Frequency of public transport routes (stops / h).
  • Public and business infrastructure and adjacent areas
    Collapse
    SAFETY
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of illuminated parts of streets, driveways, embankments (%).
    • 2. Number of recorded cases of robbery / rape / murder / fights in public places per 1,000 inhabitants (cases / 1,000 people).
    • 3. Share of empty commercial spaces in total retail space (%).
    • 4. Share of road network segments with 24-hour infrastructure (%).
    COMFORT
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of developed mixed-use public business districts (%).
    • 2. Access to payment infrastructure (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 3. Percentage of shopping and office centers located within walking distance of public transport stops (%).
    • 4. Share of business and office centers possessing underground parking (%).
    ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLINESS
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of the city area cleaned mechanically (%).
    • 2. Share of emissions from stationary sources of pollution in total emissions (%).
    • 3. Percentage of shopping and office centers using energy-saving technologies (%).
    • 4. Share of roads with energy-saving lighting (%).
    IDENTITY AND DIVERSITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Concentration of cultural heritage objects (no. / km2).
    • 2. Concentration of cafes with outdoor verandas along streets in the public business zone (no. / km).
    • 3. Area of retail zones (m2 / 1,000 people).
    • 4. Percentage of redeveloped markets in total markets in the city (%).
    ENVIRONMENT MODERNITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Level of development of public business districts in the city (no. / ha).
    • 2. Area of urban development occupied by territories of non-functioning enterprises (%).
    • 3. Share of first floors of buildings in the public business zone occupied by commercial and public functions (%).
    • 4. Share of commercial areas along the streets of the public business zone designed in accordance with the established design code (%).
  • Public and recreational infrastructure and adjacent areas
    Collapse
    SAFETY
    • 1.
      2017
      Rate of juvenile crime (no. / person).
    • 2. Share of buildings occupied by educational and healthcare institutions close to which measures to reduce car traffic have been implemented (%).
    • 3. Share of buildings in an unsafe condition occupied by educational organizations (%).
    • 4. Share of buildings in an unsafe condition occupied by healthcare institutions (%).
    COMFORT
    • 1.
      2017
      Diversity of cultural and sports functions in the city (%).
    • 2. Percentage of schools equipped with a sports ground (%).
    • 3. Percentage of schools adapted for low-mobility citizens (%).
    • 4. Percentage of clinics and hospitals not adapted for low-mobility citizens (%).
    ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLINESS
    • 1.
      2017
      Accessibility of sports grounds for the citizens (%).
    • 2. Share of buildings occupied by educational organizations possessing their own green areas (%).
    • 3. Average area of physical culture zone in total school territory (%).
    • 4. Share of buildings occupied by healthcare institutions possessing their own green area (%).
    IDENTITY AND DIVERSITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of cultural heritage objects in which theaters, museums and libraries are located (%).
    • 2. Number of music, art, choreography schools for children (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 3. Number of museums and theaters (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 4. Share of healthcare and educational institutions built based on individual projects (%).
    ENVIRONMENT MODERNITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Attendance rate of museums and theaters (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 2. Share of territories occupied by educational organizations, partially or completely open to citizens (%).
    • 3. Percentage of educational institutions where open cultural and educational events are held (%).
    • 4. Percentage of libraries and museums where cultural and educational events are held (%).
  • Entire city space
    Collapse
    SAFETY
    • 1.
      2017
      Total number of crimes in the city (no. / 1,000 people).
    • 2. Number of abandoned buildings (no. / km2).
    • 3. Share of ambulances reaching their destination within 20 minutes (%).
    • 4. Share of road network with road markings (%).
    COMFORT
    • 1.
      2017
      Average distance between public transport stops (m).
    • 2. Share of urban development included in the public transport network (%).
    • 3. Share of regularly cleaned urban areas (%).
    • 4. Share of streets formed by the front of construction sites in the total length of the city streets (%).
    ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLINESS
    • 1.
      2017
      Level of urban greenery (%).
    • 2. Atmospheric pollution index (API).
    • 3. Volume of processed solid household waste per capita (thousand m3 / person).
    • 4. Incidence rate for cancer and respiratory diseases (cases / 1,000 people).
    IDENTITY AND DIVERSITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Number of places where the highest number of street photos shared on social networks are taken (no.).
    • 2. Number of public celebrations and festivals held by the municipality (no.).
    • 3. Share of new housing within the boundaries of the existing urban development area in the total amount of residential construction (%).
    • 4. Share of apartment buildings with balcony areas decorated in a single style within a single house (%).
    ENVIRONMENT MODERNITY
    • 1.
      2017
      Share of citizens working in the tertiary sector of the economy (%).
    • 2. Functional diversity of urban development (functions / km2).
    • 3. Ratio of working population to retirement age population (%).
    • 4. Variety of activities under the Russian Classification of Types of Economic Activity (OKVED) (number).

Areas:

  • 1. Housing and adjacent areas. Residential buildings and surrounding grounds.
  • 2. Green and water areas. City territory covered with vegetation, including parks, squares, forests, as well as areas adjacent to urban water bodies.
  • 3. Street infrastructure. City streets of different types, including territories from facade to facade, with the exception of roadways. Street infrastructure is evaluated separately, regardless of its location in the city.
  • 4. Public recreational infrastructure and adjacent areas. Territories adjacent to educational institutions (schools, colleges, nurseries), medical and health care institutions (hospitals, health centers, dispensaries), sports and recreational facilities (recreation centers, stadiums, sports grounds), cultural institutions (cinemas, museums, exhibition spaces), as well as objects with religious functionality.
  • 5. Public and business infrastructure and adjacent areas. Territories adjacent to administrative, business, commercial facilities, as well as public eating places, objects related to the provision of services.
  • 6. Entire city space. The entire territory of the city within its administrative boundaries. The introduction of this area is necessary for the evaluation of citywide characteristics concerning environmental quality that do not relate directly to any single type of area.

*The rating excludes manufacturing, agricultural and mining zones, as well as special and ritual areas. The environmental qualities of such zones are evaluated as part of the relevant production process and, where necessary, in accordance with special regulations on their maintenance. The influence of such territories on the urban environment is regarded as indirect and is evaluated based on indicators in other areas.

Criteria:

  • 1. «Safety» relates to both the current level of danger in specific areas and the evaluation of environmental criteria that can potentially cause harm to human life and health.
  • 2. «Comfort» helps to evaluate the convenience of the urban environment, as well as its visual, acoustic and climatic characteristics.
  • 3. «Environmental friendliness» determines the extent to which the use of the city corresponds to the principle of the conservation and improvement of the environment, as well as evaluates the state of particular elements of the urban environment.
  • 4. «Identity and diversity» evaluates the identity and recognizability of the urban area, as well as determines the variability of spatial solutions and the functional diversity of the urban environment.
  • 5. «Environment modernity» evaluates the city in terms of opportunities provided to citizens. This indicator helps to determine whether the city uses an outdated environment production model or a new one that considers the environment to be one of the basic values in urban development.

HOW IS IT EVALUATED

In order not to compare disparate cities, not to rate them in accordance with their size and budget, all cities are distributed according to size-climatic groups.

Groups of cities for formation of the evaluation scale and comparative ratings

Size of the city Conditionally comfortable climate Conditionally uncomfortable climate
Million+  15  -  
Large 60   4 + 4 = 8
Medium   86
Small   876 67  

The obtained values of indicators are only compared among cities within the same group. Each group has its own leader, showing the best values among similar cities. This method allows the influence of constant factors that do not depend on the effectiveness of management of urban areas to be taken into account. Thus, the share of green spaces in Anadyr is not compared with the share of green spaces in Gelendzhik, and Krasnoyarsk is not compared with Suzdal.

The integral index is calculated as the sum of 30 values evaluated on a scale from 0 to 10. Points are evenly distributed between the maximum and minimum indicators within the group.

DATA SOURCES

To evaluate the quality of the urban environment, data meeting four criteria were used:

  • 1. Available in all 1,112 cities of Russia;
  • 2. Collected in the same manner in each of the studied cities;
  • 3. Verifiable;
  • 4. Updated annually.
  • Federal State Statistics Service
    Data collection for the previous year ends by the beginning of May.
  • Internet sources
    Updated regularly. Relevant all year round.
  • GLONASS and GPS
    Updated regularly. Relevant all year round.
  • Satellite imagery data sources
    Archival images are available all year round. Images are available the month after they are taken.
  • Geoinformation systems
    Relevant all year round.
  • Photographs from social networks
    Relevant all year round. Optimal for use after the period of summer activity in open spaces.
  • Open data of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation
    Data collection for the previous year ends by the beginning of May.

INITIATORS OF THE PROJECT

Ministry of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation

A federal executive body, the Ministry develops and implements state policy and regulations in the spheres of construction, architecture, urban development, housing and utilities, provides services to the public and manages state property in the relevant spheres.

The decree on the creation of the Ministry of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation was signed on the November 1, 2013, by the President of the Russian Federation. From the same date, Mikhail Men was appointed minister.

Website: minstroyrf.ru

Unified Development Institution in the Housing Sector

The Unified Development Institution in the Housing Sector was established in 2015 by the Government of the Russian Federation on the basis of the Agency for Housing Mortgage Lending (AHML). The main objectives of the Institute are the provision of land resources to developers, development of the rental housing market, support of the mortgage market, development of the secondary mortgage lending market, and creation of a comfortable urban environment.

A non-profit organization, the Foundation for the Unified Development Institute in the Housing Sector was established in 2016 on behalf of the Government of the Russian Federation for the implementation of state social projects and programs in the field of housing construction development, increasing the availability of mortgage lending for specific categories of citizens, as well as improving the quality of the environment and living conditions. The founder of the fund is the AHML.

Website: дом.рф

Strelka KB

Strelka KB provides strategic consulting services in the fields of complex urban solutions and spatial planning. The company structure includes the Center for Anthropological Research, the Center for Urban Economics, the Center for Urban Planning and the Center for GIS-Research.

Strelka KB staff have created an expert network throughout 45 countries and 24 regions of the Russian Federation. Within the framework of the Urban Environment Development Program and the Mono-town Project for strategic development of the Russian Federation, Strelka KB acts as the initiator of improvements in the quality of the urban environment in 360 Russian cities.

Strelka KB’s clients include the Ministry of Construction of the Russian Federation, the Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation, the Moscow City Government, the AHML, Burbank, Gazprom Neft, the Skolkovo Foundation, UNESCO and others. Central streets and parks renovated in accordance with Strelka KB’s standards and accepted by the Moscow Government have become Moscow’s new calling card.

Strelka KB was founded in 2013 by the Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design. Director General and co-founder: Denis Leontiev. Co-founder and partner: Varvara Melnikova. Partners: Grigory Revzin, Alexei Muratov, Dalia Safiullina, Alexandra Sytnikova.

Strelka KB is the first company in Russia that uses the principles of public benefit corporation, investing profits in the development of the Strelka Institute, 80% of the budget of which is funded by Strelka KB.

Website: strelka-kb.com